Move over, Adobe — Ubuntu Studio, due in April, promises to put a full, completely open-source graphics package together for Linux. The OS and apps will all be bundled together for easy installation. We recently covered pure:dyne, a high-performance visual OS. Ubuntu Studio looks a little friendlier and broader for newcomers; it’ll be interesting if it can make Linux installation and configuration easy even for the truly lazy — to make Linux graphics an impulse install. (I can test that, certainly.) pure:dyne I’m expecting will remain the best choice for Pd, but Ubuntu Studio looks like it may be promising, as well.

In a single install for PCs and Macs, Ubuntu Studio packs a lot of firepower:

  1. kino, for non-linear video editing
  2. Stop motion and animation tools
  3. Inkscape and GIMP, for vector and bitmap editing
  4. Blender, for 3D
  5. F-spot for image management
  6. Wacom tools

Pd is included, but not with all the goodies in pure:dyne, so if you’re interested in patching, that’s still the way to go. In fact, I notice this is generally missing tools for live visuals. We’ll have to keep an eye on this, though, as plenty of VJ/visualist/video tools are on the wish list, like gephex and freej. Most promising: veejay for dyne. Anyone who might be able to help contribute and put that together, I’m sure they’d love to have you!

Full list of packages
Ubuntu Studio Wiki
Analysis for music from Create Digital Music

  • A real linux user

    fuck im tired of ubuntu

  • another linux user

    I see you mention pure:dyne, if you look at the applications in pure:dyne, not only indeed pd is complete but all the regular gimp, kino, inkscape, rezound and blender are already there and much more!

  • http://www.myspace.com/darktowerproject a wannabe linux user

    I don't remember reading about pure:dyne not having those apps, so what was the point of mentioning that? I assumed the point was that Ubuntu Studio could provide a multimedia suite which is "a little friendlier and broader for newcomers."

    I'm using pure:dyne right now, and as a Linux novice, I'm having a wonderful time trying to figure out why pure:dyne won't mount my external drives or capture from my camcorder.

    I don't think these distros are in competition with each other; One is all about power, the other is about ease.