The pace of technology has made past and future fold in on themselves, to the point where old things can look futuristic, what was once techno-shock can become nostalgic warmth, and the future can look dated. Our own Matt Earp waxed poetic on music’s take on these aesthetics by connecting them to worn VHS tapes. Com Truise’s music follows a similar pattern. Here, in an evidently-unofficial video, one Myk Dawg takes a straightforward approach: he just puts together a whole bunch of DOS visuals, animating screens from real software tools and generating new motion from text characters.

Of course, that doesn’t make the results less satisfying. File this away when you get audited for buying old PCs on eBay: it is a business expense, after all.

The more screens you recognize, the more awesome you are. If the rough, acid-colored textures of the ASCII or ANSI characters trigger deep memories of what each hex code is, you are the most awesome winner of everything.

And, of course, watch on your eight-core machine in 720p, because…

Kids, ask your parents, or show your parents how to install a virtual DOS machine on their MacBook Pro. Via Adi Robertson over on The Verge, easily my favorite general-tech site.

Here’s some official Com Truise video action, too:

http://comtruise.com/

  • http://www.facebook.com/humblesound Eric Rieper

    Last night a QBASIC saved my life. (Last night being the earliest formative years of my childhood.)

  • Nataliejo

    Com Truise is the best. Rad post.

  • http://twitter.com/DeepSEA_Detroit Scott
  • notpart@ofanysocialnetwork.com

    “he just puts together a whole bunch of DOS visuals, animating screens
    from real software tools and generating new motion from text
    characters.
    Of course, that doesn’t make the results less satisfying”

    Actually it does.

    Apart from any specific worth of the art itself, it’s a mnemonic of a period in which art and engineering formed a collaboration of what was possible. There was a specific desire to transcend the limitations of the time, to create work that excelled. Now, this work and the whole of the rapidly bloating ‘New Aesthetic’ is a very safe, very limited borrowing of the energy of that movement, while at the same time donating no energy of its own.

    Reenacting a battle should never be confused with fighting the battle itself.

    • Blackgallant

       well put together and valid point, for some it wont resonate but for others who may have never seen it / put together in a new format can be quite exciting. Sometimes great art just says things again but slightly differently or a new context or to a new audience. Can’t win them all over but can’t expect too / it’s not designed to.